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Amid Cultural Shifts, Nebraskans Wrestle with Fault Lines and Look to Build Bridges

According to a new survey by the Public Religion Research Institute, “Nebraskans are more likely than Americans overall to be born in the U.S. and to live in the community in which they grew up, but they are simultaneously more likely than Americans overall to report that they live in a community with many new immigrants. Like Americans overall, Nebraskans are divided starkly along party lines over the meaning and future implications of these changes.” notes PRRI CEO Robert P. Jones.

The survey showed results that nearly 46% of Nebraskans live in the communities where they grew up, compared to 33% of Americans. A majority of 52% say they have spent their entire lives in the state, while another 25% have lived in the state for 20 or more years.

Almost one in four Nebraskans say they live in a community with many new immigrants, and an additional 37% say they live in a community with at least some new immigrants—rates significantly higher than Americans overall.

Noted Observations form the survey noted:

  • Almost half (48%) of Nebraskans mostly agreed with the statement, “I would prefer the U.S. to be a nation made up of people from all over the world.”
  • Less than one in ten (7%) agreed with the statement, “I would prefer the U.S. to be a nation primarily made up of people from Western European heritage.”
  • Nearly one in five (18%) prefer the U.S. “to be a nation primarily made up of people who follow the Christian faith.”
  • Approximately six in ten (58%) say the state is going in the right direction, while 41% say it has gotten off on the wrong track.

READ MORE: Chamber Survey On Housing Affordability 


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